Admissions Frequently Asked Questions

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Admissions Statistics

2014 Entering Class*

(*Subject to change. Official ABA statistics are not set until after Oct. 5, 2014)

Total Applications 1252    
LSAT
GPA
 
Incoming Class Size 228   75th Percentile
157
3.64
 
Female 48%   Median
154
3.45
 
Minority 28%   25th Percentile
151
3.17
 
Colleges & Universities Represented 78          

 

Employment Statistics (Class of 2013)

Number of Graduates: 234 (100% reported)

Employed within 9 months of graduation: 80.25%

 

*Statistics below are out of 181 employed graduates

 
Private Practice 55.0%   Bar Passage Required (Full-time) 79.6%
Business & Industry 21.5%   Bar Passage Required (Part-time) 2.8%
Government & Public Interest 12.6%   JD Advantage (Full-time) 15.5%
Judicial Clerk 5.8%   JD Advantage (Part-time) 1.1%
Academic 1.6%   Other Professional (Full-time) 5.5%
      Other Professional (Part-time) 0%
      Non-Professional (Full-time) 0.6%
Employed in Texas* 95%   Non-Professional (Part-time) 0.6%
       

More detailed information can also be found on the Career Services website.

Application Process

  1. How do I submit my application?
  2. Applications must be submitted electronically through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service Online Application.

  3. How do I submit letters of recommendation/evaluations?
  4. Applicants must have their recommenders submit their letters of recommendations and/or evaluations directly to LSAC using their Credential Assembly Service. Applicants are required to submit 1 letter or evaluation, but most applicants submit two-three. Letters or evaluations mailed to the law school will not be considered.

  5. Can the application be used for any semester?
  6. No. We accept first-year students for the fall semester only. We accept transfer and visiting students for all semesters. Please choose the appropriate electronic application to apply for admission as an entering, transfer (fall, spring, summer), or visiting (fall, spring, summer) student. If you are denied admission and choose to reapply in a subsequent year, you must complete a new application form.

  7. How soon will I get a decision?
  8. The Texas Tech University School of Law considers applications on a rolling admissions basis. When an applicant's file is complete, it becomes eligible for consideration. We try to have decisions made for all Early Decision applicants by January 15 and Regular Decision applicants by the first week of April. The earlier you apply, the higher your chances of receiving a decision before the end of that time window. Worthy applicants who apply after the deadline significantly reduce their odds of acceptance.

  9. Will you accept my spring semester grades?
  10. Yes. An updated transcript may be submitted to LSAC Credential Assembly Service at any time and the cumulative grade point average will be recomputed to reflect the newer grades. An updated report will be automatically be electronically transmitted to the Texas Tech University School of Law.

  11. May I schedule a personal interview?
  12. No. Time limitations and the large number of applicants prevent us from granting personal interviews.

  13. May I appeal the denial of my application?
  14. Decisions made by the Admissions Committee are final and not subject to appeal. If an applicant has significant new information to add to their application, such as a new LSAT score or GPA,the applicant may request reconsideration of their file.

  15. What factors are weighed in making a decision on my application?
  16. While considerable weight is placed upon your LSAT score and grade point average, the Admissions Committee looks beyond the quantitative data in making its decisions and considers factors such as experience, extracurricular activities and interests, and evidence of leadership qualities.

  17. Do you accept late applications?
  18. Yes. Late applications will not be reviewed until after all timely applications are reviewed. The School of Law reserves the right to return any application and application fee submitted after the deadline.

  19. When do I file my Declaration of Intent to Study Law form?
  20. The Texas Board of Law Examiners requires that every person who intends to take the Texas Bar examination to file a Declaration of Intention to Study Law. This must be filed with the Board during the student's first year of law school and must be accompanied by a copy of the student's law school application. Please make a copy of your application and keep it to submit with your declaration. The filing deadlines for such declarations are as follows: fall entrants, October 1; Summer Entry Program students, September 15.

    The declaration must be filed on a form promulgated by the Board. The declaration requires disclosure of all legal and academic offenses. The admissions application requires the same disclosures. Any discrepancies between the two forms are reported to the School of Law. Possible disciplinary action, including revocation of admission or suspension, may result.

    After filing the Declaration of Intention to Study Law, the applicant will have to be fingerprinted. A time will be scheduled at the law school for the fingerprinting. Each student will be required to pay a fee of $9.95 by credit card, certified check, or money order at the time the prints are taken.

    The forms may be accessed online at www.ble.state.tx.us/Forms/main_formsindex.html and should be filed after classes start by the deadlines shown above. The filing fee for the Declaration of Intention to Study Law is $190. Students who expect to practice in other states should investigate possible similar requirements in such states.

  21. How does TTU evaluate law school transfer credit?
  22. Students may receive transfer credit for courses completed at other law schools approved by the American Bar Association in two ways. Students who initially matriculate at another ABA-approved law school may transfer to Texas Tech University School of Law and receive credits for courses taken at the other school. Second, students at Texas Tech University School of Law may receive credit for courses taken as a visiting student at another ABA-approved law school. The following policies govern both situations.

    1. Students cannot transfer more than 30 credits for courses taken at other ABA-approved law schools to be counted towards the requirements of the J.D. degree from the Texas Tech University School of Law. No credit will be transferred for courses taken at a law school that is not approved by the American Bar Association.
    2. Only the credits for courses taken at another law school will be recorded on a student's Texas Tech University transcript. The grades for these courses will not be recorded on the student's transcript and will not be used to compute the student's cumulative grade point average at the Texas Tech University School of Law.
    3. The credit for a course taken at another law school will not transfer unless the student receives a grade for the course at or above that law school's grade point average required for graduation. If the other law school requires a "C" cumulative grade point average for graduation, for example, and the student receives a passing grade lower than a "C" (e.g. D+), credit for that course will not transfer.
    4. The credit for a course at another law school graded on a pass-fail basis will not transfer. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs may authorize the transfer of credit for a course graded on a pass-fail basis if the instructor for that course certifies that the student would have received a grade at or above the school's grade point average required for graduation had the course been graded on a basis other than pass-fail.
    5. Students cannot receive credit for courses taken at another law school and at the Texas Tech University School of Law in the same subject. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will determine whether a particular course violates this rule.
    6. If a student has completed a course at another law school in a subject required for graduation at the Texas Tech University School of Law but the credit is less than the amount required for graduation here, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs may designate another course in the subject area which the student can take to satisfy the graduation requirement if the credits for the original course and the additional course meet or exceed the credits required. A transfer student must register for substitute courses in his or her first year at the Texas Tech University School of Law which, if completed successfully, will meet graduation requirements in that subject. If the Associate Dean is not able to designate a substitute course from the curriculum in the transfer student's first year here, that student must take the Texas Tech University course in that subject.
    7. A degree-program student at Texas Tech wishing to transfer credit for courses at another law school must obtain permission from the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs prior to enrolling in the courses. The student must file a Request to Transfer Credit for Courses from Another Law School form prior to enrolling at the other law school. If the student is unable to register for the courses for which he or she has permission, the student must file an amended Request to Transfer Credit form to reflect the new course selections.
    8. A student who does not begin his or her law studies at the Texas Tech University School of Law and who is awarded transfer credit for courses at another law school shall not be eligible for election to academic honor societies.

  23. Can transfers earn a spot on a journal (Texas Tech Law Review, Administrative Law Journal, Estate Planning & Community Property Law Journal)?
  24. The Texas Tech Law Review write-on process is the same for transfer students as it is for non-transfer students. All candidates who wish to be considered for membership on any of the three student publications must participate in the Tri-Journal Write-On Competition, which begins immediately after 1L finals. To participate in the write-on, transfer students must email Donna Jones (donna.jones@ttu.edu), Law Review Secretary, by May 1 to request a packet. Packet requests received after this date will not be honored. The deadlines for transfer students are the same as for non-transfer students. Late packets will not be graded.

    Mail or hand deliver completed packets to:  

    Texas Tech School of Law
    Law Review
    1802 Hartford Ave.
    Lubbock, TX 79409-0004

    For more information about the write-on process, please contact Donna Jones.

Application Requirements

  1. Does the application require a personal statement and a resume?
  2. Yes. The personal statement should discuss your motivation for seeking a career in law and your goals relevant to the profession. You can also use this opportunity to present information regarding any personal experiences, past challenges or disadvantages and how you overcame them, or any special conditions you believe relevant.

  3. Are letters of recommendation or evaluations required?
  4. Yes. A minimum of one letter of recommendation or evaluation is required. Applicants are encouraged to submit up to three letters/evaluations.

    The LSAC Evaluation Service requires evaluators to assess the strength of the applicant in six categories: intellectual skill, personal qualities, integrity and honesty, communication, task management, and working with others. Letters of Recommendation/Evaluations will be transmitted as part of your Credential Assembly Service (CAS) report. An application will not be considered complete prior to receipt of these Letters of Recommendation/Evaluations. The Admissions Committee will examine the basis for the evaluator’s comments when deciding the importance to assign to the letters of recommendation/evaluations. The committee assigns little significance to letters or evaluations written by politicians, attorneys, or judges whose opinion of the applicant is primarily based on a personal relationship to the applicant or applicant's family. If the evaluator can speak only to knowing you as a family acquaintance or simply repeat the accomplishments listed in your resume, the evaluation or letter will not assist the Admissions Committee. The committee values comments made by those with whom you have had a close working or academic relationship.

  5. What is the application fee?
  6. The application fee is $50.

Application Status

  1. Can I call to check the status of my application?
  2. No. All applicants will receive an email to confirm receipt of their application, and that email will contain a link to view your status online. Admissions decisions will not be given out over the phone for privacy and security reasons.

  3. How soon will I get a decision?
  4. We strive to make all decisions by early April. We review files on a rolling basis beginning in November (for early decision applicants) and January (for regular decision applicants).

  5. How does the waitlist work?
  6. Some applicants may display qualities or achievements that indicate they could succeed at the School of Law, but may not have the numerical or other qualifications to merit acceptance at the time they are reviewed. Other applicants may have strong applications, but they applied late in the year when no space was available in the class. The law scool uses a waitlist in those situations in order to manage the size and make up of the incoming class. When a student is waitlisted, their file remains under consideration until a final determination can be made. When a final decision is made, the applicant will be notified. It is possible, though rare, that applicants could remain on the waitlist until as late as August before a final decision can be made.

Costs

  1. What is the cost of tuition, books, and supplies?
  2. Tuition and fees for 2013-2014 are $22,518 for Texas Residents and $32,238 for non-residents (based on 30 credit hours). For a detailed tuition and fee schedule, visit our Financial Aid page.

    Students who move to Texas after reaching the age of 18 are considered to be nonresidents unless they have resided in the state for other than educational purposes for a period of 12 months immediately preceding enrollment. Questions of residency status frequently arise concerning members of the Armed Forces assigned to duty in Texas and persons who have been Texas residents but have moved out of Texas for employment. Applicants in these and other circumstances involving questionable residency status should seek clarification from the Law School.

  3. What is the application fee? Can I get it waived?
  4. The application fee is $50. The School of Law automatically waives the application fee for applicants who receive a waiver from the Law School Admissions Council.

    Individual requests for fee-waivers are granted only on the basis of need.  While we do also give waivers to various groups/categories for recruitment purposes, applicants cannot request these waivers. We send them out during the fall and early spring using LSAC’s CRS system.  If you qualify for such a waiver, you will receive one through that process.  Applicants must authorize the release of their information through the CRS system in order to be receive these emails. Applicants who visit Texas Tech Law in person at any recruitment event will also receive an application fee waiver.

    If you would like to request a need based fee waiver, submit a monthly budget and an explanation of your financial situation (e.g. you qualify for Pell grants, are working full-time, no parental support, etc.), and we will consider your request.The fact that you are planning to apply to a large number of law schools, absent other factors, does not qualify as “need.”

    Other fee waivers are need based and issued on a case-by-case basis. Applicants wanting a fee waiver may email admissions.law@ttu.edu with a detailed budget outlining their financial need.

  5. If I am accepted, will I have to pay a deposit?
  6. All accepted applicants are required to pay a deposit soon after being accepted to hold their place in the entering class. Applicants who fail to submit their deposit by the date specified in their acceptance letter will forfeit their place in the entering class. Applicants accepted in the Early Decision Program will be required to pay a non-refundable deposit of $500.

    Those accepted in the Regular Decision Admission process will be required to submit a first deposit of $300 no earlier than April 1, in accordance with the LSAC Statement of Good Admission and Financial Aid Practices. Students admitted close to or after April 1 will have approximately 2-4 weeks to submit their first deposit. A second deposit of $500 is due June 1. Regular Decision applicants who fail to submit the second deposit by the deadline will forfeit their place in the entering class.

    Both the initial deposit and the June deposit are refunded upon matriculation at the Texas Tech University School of Law.

Deadlines

  1. When will the application become available?
  2. The new application becomes available on or about September 1.

  3. When is the deadline for applications?
  4. Early Decision Program: November 1. Application must be complete, i.e. we must have received an LSAC CAS report, by November 10. This option is best for applicants who have investigated other law schools and believe that the Texas Tech University School of Law is their top choice. Acceptance through the Early Decision Program is non-binding.

    Regular Decision Program: February 15.

    There is no firm application deadline for transfer or visiting applicants, however transfer applicants should apply as early as possible to allow time to evaluate your law school transcripts.

    Applicants are encouraged to apply even if they do not have updated transcripts reflecting their most recent semester's grades.

  5. Can I apply after the deadline?
  6. We will accept your application for Regular Decision after the February deadline, but your chance of admission will be diminished because many acceptances will have been made by the time your file is considered. The School of Law reserves the right to return any application and application fee submitted after the February 1 deadline.

  7. When do I file my Declaration of Intent to Study Law form?
  8. The Texas Board of Law Examiners requires that every person who intends to take the Texas Bar examination must file a Declaration of Intention to Study Law. This must be filed with the Board during the student's first year of law school and must be accompanied by a copy of the student's law school application. Please make a copy of your application and keep it to submit with your declaration. The filing deadlines for such declarations are as follows: fall entrants, October 1; summer entrants, September 15.

    The declaration must be filed on a form promulgated by the Board. The declaration requires disclosure of all legal and academic offenses. The admissions application requires the same disclosures. Any discrepancies between the two forms are reported to the School of Law. Possible disciplinary action, including revocation of admission or suspension, may result.

    After filing the Declaration of Intention to Study Law, the applicant will have to be fingerprinted. A time will be scheduled at the law school for the fingerprinting. Each student will be required to pay a fee of $9.95 by credit card, certified check, or money order at the time the prints are taken.

    The forms may be accessed online at www.ble.state.tx.us/Forms/ main_formsindex.html and should be filed after classes start by the deadlines shown above. The filing fee for the Declaration of Intention to Study Law is $190. Students who expect to practice in other states should investigate possible similar requirements in such states.

Financial Aid & Scholarships

    1. What scholarship opportunities are available and when will I know if I am receiving a scholarship?
    2. Incoming students are automatically considered for all scholarships for which they are eligible. The Admissions Office awards scholarships to incoming students primarily on the basis of merit. Admitted students from select colleges and universities are eligible to be nomitated by those schools for additional scholarship through the Presidential Scholarship program. All recipients will be notified of their awards at the time of acceptance or shortly thereafter.

      Second and third year students who were not awarded scholarships upon admission are able to apply for scholarship funds based on their law school performance during the spring semester.

    3. What is the FICE code for completing the FAFSA?
    4. The code for Texas Tech University is 003644.

    5. What is the retention rate for first-year scholarships?
    6. Scholarship Retention Data
        1st Year Class Size Total # w/ Scholarship # Entering w/ Conditional Scholarships* # Whose Conditional Scholarships Have been Reduced or Eliminated
      Students Matriculating In        
      2011
      236
      96
      82
      35
      2010
      244
      65
      39
      16
      2009
      213
      57
      38
      13

      *The condition for all conditional scholarships in the 2012 entering class was a ranking in the top half (50th percentile) of the class. The conditions for previous years were either top half or top third (67th percentile) depending on the scholarship.

    LSAT

    1. How do I register for the LSAT?
    2. Visit the Law School Admission Council's website www.lsac.org.

    3. When can I take the LSAT?
    4. Unlike other graduate school exams, the LSAT is only offered four times a year. The dates are typically in February, June, October, and December. The exact dates can be found at www.lsac.org.

    5. Is the Feburary LSAT too late if I want to start this fall?
    6. Usually. Applicants taking later LSAT administrations need not wait for a score before submitting their application. It is better to submit your application before the deadline than to wait for your score and submit a late application. However, applicants who take the LSAT for the first time in February will not receive their scores and become complete until March, at which point many offers of admission have already been made, thereby reducing the chances of acceptance.

    7. How are multiple LSAT scores evaluated?
    8. We consider all LSAT scores, but the higher score is what is used for statistical purposes. It is still in the best interest of the applicant to fully prepare for the exam and plan on sitting for the exam once. Never take the LSAT exam for practice under the belief that you can achieve a higher score at a later date.

    Special Programs

    1. Does Texas Tech offer an Early Decision Program?
    2. Yes. Applications must be received by November 1, and the applicant’s LSAC Credential Assembly Service Report must be received from Law Services no later than November 10.

      Applicants accepted through the Early Decision Program will be required to submit non-refundable deposits earlier in the admissions cycle than applicants in the regular admissions program. Beginning with the 2012-2013 application cycle, our Early Decision program will be non-binding. Applicants accepted through the program and who pay their seat deposit are not required to withdrawn applications at other law schools.

      The Admissions Committee may choose to defer some applications received under the Early Decision Program for consideration in Texas Tech University School of Law's regular admissions program.

    3. I am in the Honors College at Texas Tech University. Are there special admissions programs for which I am eligible?
    4. Yes. Students in the Texas Tech Honors College are eligible to apply for the Texas Tech University Honors College 3+3 program or Early Decision Plan.

      The Honors 3+3 program allows outstanding Honors students to replace their senior year of undergraduate education with their first year of law school, thereby completing both in six years instead of seven.

      The Honors College Early Decision Plan allows outstanding Honors College students to apply during their junior year and, if accepted, guaratee a place in our incoming class upon graduation. This does not save any time, but it does allow students to have their law school plans made a year sooner than normal.

      More information on each of these programs can be found here.

    5. Should I apply under the Early Decision Program or the Regular Admission Program?
    6. The Early Decision Program is for applicants that have considered several law schools thoroughly and have concluded that a Texas Tech legal education is the one most compatible with their goals for a professional education. The Early Decision Program is binding and requires a non-refundable deposit. Applicants that are "undecided" about which law school they wish to attend or desire to "weigh their options" should apply under the Regular Decision Program.

    7. Is there a separate application for the Summer Entry Program?
    8. No. The Admissions Committee will select approximately 15 students for summer entry from among the early and regular admission applicants.

    9. Do you have any dual degree or certificate programs available?
    10. Yes. The Texas Tech University School of Law has numerous dual degree programs. A full list can be found here.

    11. Can I specialize in a particular area of law?
    12. Although concentration or specialization is neither required nor encouraged, the law school curriculum is sufficiently broad to allow, through a judicious use of electives, a concentration in some areas of law. These areas include Property and Estate Planning, Tax Law Litigation, Judicial Administration and Procedure, Environmental and Natural Resource Planning, Public Interest Law, Commercial Law, Business Association, Criminal Law, International Law, and Administrative Law. Applicants should view the curriculum to ensure that a sufficient number of courses (including supplemental and related courses) are offered in their area of interest.