Apply to Texas Tech University School of Law

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The following information describes the application procedures of the Texas Tech University School of Law. Before preparing your application, please read this material carefully. If you have any questions, contact Admissions at (806) 742-3990 ext. 273, or email admissions.law@ttu.edu.

  1. Online Application
  2. Application Deadlines
  3. The deadline for Early Decision is November 1, and the deadline for Regular Decision is March 1. Late applications will be considered based on space available.

    Transfer and visiting students may apply and enter before any semester and should submit their applications as far in advance of the semester they want to enter as possible.

    You may submit your application before you have completed your undergraduate degree, but you must completed your degree by the time you enroll. There is no need to delay submitting your application in order to include grades from a semester in progress. You may submit an updated transcript to the LSAC Credential Assembly Service at any time, and your grade point average will be recomputed and reported to all law schools you have designated. The Texas Tech University School of Law will send you an e-mail message to acknowledge receipt of the application forms and to inform you when your file is complete. If you do not receive these acknowledgments within a reasonable time period, contact the Admissions Office to make inquiries.

  4. Application Checklist
  5. The Admissions Committee begins its consideration of an application file only when it is complete. Please use the detailed explanations and instructions, including the links to other sections of the Web site for assistance in answering the questions on the Application for Admission. If you need further information about a particular question, please contact the Admissions Office.

    1. A COMPLETED ELECTRONIC APPLICATION
    Applicants should take care to answer each question fully. The answers to the questions help the members of the Admissions Committee understand the background and educational experience of the applicant so that an informed decision can be made. Applicants must disclose prior academic and legal offenses, and, they agree to inform the Texas Tech University School of Law promptly of offenses that occur after they submit their application. Applicants should read the questions requiring disclosure of offenses very carefully. The Texas Tech University School of Law and the Bar examiners in Texas and other states generally view the failure to answer questions fully as a lack of integrity on the applicant’s part. Failing to disclose an offense may result in the revocation of an offer of admission at any time after an applicant begins the study of law.

    In addition, the Honor Code of the Texas Tech University School of Law applies to the application process, and failing to disclose an offense constitutes a violation that ordinarily results in a penalty of suspension for one or more semesters. Applicants should err on the side of caution and disclose all but minor traffic offenses. This includes offenses for which an applicant received only a citation and never appeared in court. If you have any questions about disclosing an offense, you should contact the Admissions Office.

    2. LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION TEST (LSAT) SCORE
    Applicants should take the LSAT in June, October, or December of the year prior to the fall semester in which the applicant intends to enroll. The Admissions Committee will accept February test scores, but the entering class may be full before your score is reported. Applicants can register online at LSAC.org.

    3. LAW SCHOOL CREDENTIAL ASSEMBLY SERVICE (CAS) REPORT
    This is a service offered by LSAC that all applicants are required to use. All transcripts and letters of recommendation must be sent to LSAC, NOT to the admissions office.

    4. APPLICATION FEE
    A non-refundable application fee of $50. You must pay online through LSAC.

    5. PERSONAL STATEMENT & RESUME

    There is no required format or prompt for the personal statement, and it should be limited to two to three pages in length. You may wish to discuss your motivation for seeking a career in law and your goals relevant to the profession. You can also use this opportunity to present information regarding any personal experiences, past challenges, disadvantages and how you overcame them, or any special conditions you believe relevant. The personal statement must be a product of your own work and be prepared without the assistance of other persons or professional writing services.

    The resume should include all work, volunteer activities, honors, and other information you would like to be considered should be included. Do not omit things that you think are not relevant to the study or practice of law. Unless you are an older applicant with many years of work experience in different positions, your resume should not exceed two pages.

    6. LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION/EVALUATIONS (1 required, 2-3 suggested)

    Applicants must submit at least one letter of recommendation or evaluation and are encouraged to submit up to three. The required forms and submission instructions are available on the LSAC website as part of their Credential Assembly Service.

    The Admissions Committee will examine the basis for the evaluator’s comments when deciding the importance to assign to the letters of recommendation/evaluations. The committee assigns little significance to letters or evaluations written by politicians, attorneys, and judges whose primary basis of judgment is that the applicant is from a purely personal relationship. The committee values much more the comments made by those with whom you have had a close working relationship.


  6. Additional Considerations
  7. In addition to the application, the Texas Tech University School of Law also considers the following items when evaluating an applicant:

    • Undergraduate Studies
    • The Admissions Committee considers the cumulative GPA, but it also takes into account grade trends (upward and downward) of grades in an applicant's undergraduate record. The committee also considers the nature and difficulty of an applicant's undergraduate academic program.

    • Graduate School
    • The Admissions Committee reviews any graduate transcripts submitted with an application, and these transcripts may serve to enhance the application, depending on the quality of the work. The Admissions Committee recognizes that applicants may have several reasons for deciding to attend graduate school prior to applying for law school. An applicant attempting to show that his or her undergraduate record does not represent academic ability must show outstanding performance in graduate school. Graduate grades, however, are not included in the calculation of your undergraduate grade point average. Because the Admissions Committee considers many factors beyond graduate work, attending graduate school for the sole purpose of securing entrance to law school is not recommended. Further, if an applicant chooses to attend graduate school before law school, he or she should pursue a graduate course of study that will enhance other career opportunities. Graduate study transcripts must also be sent to the LSAC Credential Assembly Service.

    • Repeat LSAT Scores
    • While accrediting agencies require law schools to use an applicant's highest LSAT score when reporting statistical date, the Admissions Committee will consider all of an applicant's LSAT scores. Applicants are strongly encouraged to take the appropriate measures necessary to ensure their best performance on their first examination. It is never a good idea to take the actual LSAT "just for practice."

    • Work & Military Experience
    • Employment and military service, particularly those experiences evidencing maturity or providing a background that could be helpful to a lawyer, are considered in the application review.

    • Writing Samples
    • The Admissions Committee reads the LSAT writing sample and considers it when making a decision on admission. Because an attorney's work often relies on the clarity of written expression, a poorly written section will weigh against the applicant, despite the fact that this section may not be included in the LSAT score.

    • Character & Fitness Section (Criminal and Academic Discipline Issues)
    • Applicants must disclose prior academic and legal offenses. By signing the Certification Letter, applicants are agreeing to inform the Law School promptly of any new offenses that occur after they submit their application. When a new offense is reported, the applicant's file will be reviewed again as if it were being submitted for the first time.

      Disclosing an offense does not preclude admission automatically. However, failing to do so may cause the Law School and licensing boards to question the integrity of an applicant. Moreover, the Law School Honor Code applies to the application process. The failure to disclose an offense constitutes a violation of the Honor Code and may result in the revocation of an admission offer, suspension for one or more semesters, or expulsion from the law school. Applicants should read the questions requiring disclosure of offenses very carefully. Applicants should err on the side of caution and disclose all but minor traffic offenses. This includes offenses for which an applicant received only a citation and never appeared in court.

      If you have any questions about disclosing an offense, you should contact the Admissions Office. Inquiries may be made anonymously.

      Applicants should be aware that the qualifications for admission to the bar, including those related to character and fitness, vary from state to state. Prior to matriculation, applicants seeking to engage in the practice of law are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the rules of the state in which they intend to seek admission, especially those rules relating to registration, deadlines, residency requirements, character and fitness, and courses that may be required during law school. Applicants who are concerned about their eligibility to practice law should contact the Board of Law Examiners (or the appropriate committee) in the state in which the applicant intends to practice. A Comprehensive Guide to Bar Admission Requirements, which includes coverage of character and fitness requirements and contact information for each state, is available on the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners http://www.ncbex.org/assets/media_files/Comp-Guide/CompGuide.pdf.

    • Interviews
    • Time limitations and the large number of applicants prevent us from granting personal interviews. Any aspect of your background that you wish the Admissions Committee to consider should be included in your application packet, e.g. in your personal statement or an optional addendum.

    • Reapplication
    • An applicant who wishes to reapply for admission the following year need only submit a new electronic application. The applicant must submit them through the on-line application at LSAC. Materials from the previous file will be transferred to the new file, but reapplicants are encouraged to submit a new personal statement and updated resume.

    • Other Factors
      • Whether the applicant would be the first generation of the applicant’s family to attend or graduate from an institution.
      • Whether the applicant is proficient in a language other than English.
      • The applicant’s responsibilities while previously attending school, including whether the applicant has been employed, whether the applicant has helped to raise children, or similar factors.
      • The applicant’s involvement in community activities.
      • The applicant’s extracurricular activities.
      • The applicant's criminal background disclosures.
      • Any other consideration the Texas Tech University School of Law deems necessary to accomplish its stated mission.

    The Texas Tech University School of Law may deny admission to any applicant who, in the judgment of the faculty, may appear to be unfit in character to engage in the study or practice of law.

  8. Information for Foreign Applicants
  9. In addition to completing the Application for Admission, each applicant must also register for and take the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). Texas Tech University School of Law requires that your foreign transcripts be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service. If you completed any post-secondary coursework outside the United States (including its territories) or Canada, you must use this service for the evaluation of your foreign transcripts. The one exception to this requirement is if you completed the foreign work through a study abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution and the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. This service is included in the LSAC Credential Assembly Service subscription fee. A Foreign Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which will be incorporated into your LSAC Credential Assembly Service report. An official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score report, showing proficiency in English, must also be submitted to LSAC. Please contact the Educational Testing Service ( ETS) and request that your TOEFL score be submitted to LSAC. LSAC's TOEFL code for the LSAC International Transcript and Authentication Service is 0058. Your score will be included in the Foreign Credential Evaluation document that will be included in your LSAC Credential Assembly Service law school report.

    To use the LSAC service, log in to your online account and follow the instructions for registering for the service. Be sure to print out a Transcript Request Form for each institution and send it promptly to them. More time is usually required to receive foreign transcripts.

    Questions about the LSAC Credential Assembly Service can be directed to LSAC at 215-968-1001 or LSACINFO@LSAC.org.

    TOEFL/IELTS score reports showing proficiency in English also must be submitted to LSAC and cannot be more than two years old. The TOEFL score must be received directly from Educational Testing Service (ETS), and the IELTS score must be received directly from the IELTS website. Your score will be included in the Foreign Credential Evaluation documetn that will be included in your LSAC Credential Assembly Service law school report. The minimum TOEFL score required is 550 (paper-based version), 213 (computer-based version), or 79 (internet-based version); the minimum IELTS required score is an overall band score of 6.5. The TOEFL/IELTS examinations are not waived unless an applicant has a degree from a U.S. university or from a university in a country where English is the native language. Countries Texas Tech considers to have English as the native language include: Australia, Canada (except the Province of Quebec), Commonwealth Caribbean Countries (Anguilla, Antigua, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin Islands, Bermuda, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Trinidad and Tobago, and Turks and Caicos Islands), Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales), and the United States.

    Information about the TOEFL may be obtained from the Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, 877-863-3546 (I.S., U.S. Territories and Canada), 609-771-7100 (all other locations), TOEFL website.LSAC's TOEFL code for the J.D. Credential Assembly Service is 0058. Information about the IELTS may be obtained from IELTS International, 100 East Corson Street, Suite 200, Pasadena, CA 91103, T 626-564-2954, F 626-564-2981, IELTS website.

  10. Information for Transfer and Visiting Applicants
  11. TRANSFER

    Required Items:

    1. Transfer application (available online here)
    2. Personal statement that includes reasons for wanting to transfer to the Texas Tech University School of Law specifically
    3. Resume
    4. An official transcript showing grades for all law courses attempted
    5. A letter of good standing from your current school listing your present academic status and class rank
    6. One (1) letter of recommendation from a current law school professor. Letters must be submitted through the LSAC Credential Assembly Service.

    If the school does not rank its students, the letter must advise in which percentile of the first-year class the applicant stands. The transcript and letter of good standing must include final grades for all law school courses taken. The applicant must have completed the equivalent of one year of full-time law study and be in good standing at an ABA accredited law school to be considered for transfer.

    If accepted, a transfer student may be awarded a maximum of 30 semester hours of credit. Only the credits, not the grades, will be noted on a transfer student's transcript from Texas Tech University School of Law. Transfer students must complete a minimum of 60 hours of credit and four semesters in residence to be eligible for a degree from Texas Tech University School of Law.

    Because grades are not available until June and most applicants are attending the spring semester in their respective schools, most transfer decisions are made in mid-summer. Factors such as availability of space, the number of first-year courses needed, and the applicant's academic performance in law school are considered. Applicants who rank in the top 33% of their law school class have the best chances of acceptance as transfer students.

    VISTING

    Required Items:

    1. Visiting application (available online here)
    2. Personal statement that includes reasons for wanting to visit at the Texas Tech University School of Law specifically
    3. Resume
    4. An official transcript showing grades for all law courses attempted
    5. A letter of good standing from your current school listing your present academic status and stating that courses taken at Texas Tech University School of Law will be accepted for transfer.

    Students may visit for one semester or a complete academic year. There is no minimum class rank required to be admitted as a visiting student.

  12. Pre-Legal Education