Lithuania Summer Law Program — Academics and Events

Field Trips

The program cost includes local field trips to Lithuanian legal, political, and cultural institutions. During the first two weeks of the program, visits are planned for both the Lithuanian Constitutional Court and the Seimas (Parliament) of the Lithuanian Republic in Vilnius. During the last two weeks, visits are planned for a trial court in Kaunas. The Kaunas court building is an architectural heritage site included among buildings protected by the state. The program also includes several festive social events, as well as field trips that may include Old Town Vilnius, the Museum of Genocide Victims, and Grutas Park.

Students also have a choice of exciting optional excursions to other parts of Lithuania, such as Trakai Island Castle & History Museum and the coastal city of Klaipeda. Finally, students may wish to take advantage of low cost flights to visit other European countries before or after their program participation.

Lithuania Summer Abroad Program Calendar from May to June 2014 (schedule subject to change)

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
            24

10:00–12:00
Mandatory Student Orientation

12:00–14:00
Faculty Luncheon

25 26

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

27

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

28

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

29

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

30

Required visit to Lithuanian Constitutional Court and the Presidential Palace in Vilnius plus combined course lecture will replace course lectures on this day.

31

Optional field trips to be determined.

1
2

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

3

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

4

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

5

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

6

16:10–17:20
E.U. Competition Law

18:00–20:40
Public International Law

7
8 9

Exams

10

15:30–17:20
Legal Environment of Transitional Economies

18:00–19:50
Intl Environ値 Law

11

15:30–17:20
Legal Environment of Transitional Economies

18:00–19:50
Intl Environ値 Law

12

15:30–17:20
Legal Environment of Transitional Economies

18:00–19:50
Intl Environ値 Law

13

Required visit to Kaunas District Court during morning hours.

15:30–17:20
Legal Environment of Transitional Economies

18:00–19:50
Intl Environ値 Law

14

Optional field trips to be determined.

15 16

15:30–17:20
Legal Environment of Transitional Economies

18:00–19:50
Intl Environ値 Law

17

15:30–17:20
Legal Environment of Transitional Economies

18:00–19:50
Intl Environ値 Law

18

15:30–17:20
Legal Environment of Transitional Economies

18:00–19:50
Intl Environ値 Law

19

Study Day

20

Exams

 

Orientation

Saturday, May 24, 2014 at 9 a.m. marks the beginning of mandatory attendance for all students to the very important orientation and reception at VMU. This is your opportunity to meet the faculty and your fellow students. Classes, materials, and general living hints will be discussed. IF YOU MISS THE ORIENTATION, YOU MAY BE DISENROLLED FROM THE PROGRAM. DO NOT MISS IT!

Courses — Lithuania Summer Law Program in Kaunas

Session I
(May 26-June 9, 2014)

European Union Competition Law (1 credit)
Instructor: Jurgita Malinauskaite; Vytautas Magnus University

The course will analyze EU competition law. It will start with the introduction to the course, description of the objectives of competition law and policy, theories in competition law and relevant market definition. It will continue with the specific subjects and issues, such as restrictive agreements, abuse of a dominant position, merger control, and private and public enforcement of competition law. The course will conclude with the overview of the competition law in an international context.

Public International Law (2 credits)
Instructors: Jorge Ramirez and John Watts; Texas Tech University School of Law

An introductory course in international legal studies, with attention given to recognizing, analyzing, and solving international law problems in the areas of international military intervention, sociopolitical rights, economic development and well-being, and environmental protection. Special emphasis is focused on the sources of international law and the manner in which it is changing to meet the demands of the future.

Session II
(June 10-June 20, 2014)

Legal Environment of Transitional Economies: (1 credit)
Instructors: Julijia Kirsiene, Charles Szymanski, Tomas Berkmanas, and Paulius Cerka; Vytautas Magnus University

The course will discuss issues related to legal systems, human rights, business and labor law, and the role of lawyers in transitional economies, using Lithuania and other Eastern European countries as the primary examples.

International Environmental Law (1 credit)
Instructor: Vickie Sutton; Texas Tech University School of Law

This course provides a contemporary perspective of the international law applicable to transboundary and global environmental issues. It focuses on the relationship of international environmental law with international trade, development, and human rights as well as the role of international and non-governmental organizations in the development of international law and policy. The course includes discussions of case studies of disputes and investigations, such as transboundary pollution, international waterways, the global commons, global warming, import/export of hazardous substances, species extinction, and others.

Externship

Up to three U.S. students will be selected to participate in a 1-credit externship program that will run from June 20 to June 27, 2014. Students selected for an externship placement must pay an additional tuition of $1,000.00. The most likely placements will be with international law firms in Kaunas or Vilnius, or an NGO such as the NATO Security Center. We will ensure that the students work can be performed completely in English. The work the students perform will build on the academic program offered during the preceding four weeks. We are seeking opportunities for students to observe the Lithuanian judicial system in action and to expand their understanding of how international legal issues arise and are resolved. We anticipate that students will engage primarily in one or two legal research and writing projects and interact with judges and attorneys.

Selection of students for participation in the externship program will be based upon a separate on-line application that will include a personal statement, two letters of recommendation, law school transcript, and resume. Among other things, we will focus on reasons for applying and indicators tending to demonstrate your professionalism and ability to serve as a good ambassador for Texas Tech University, the State of Texas and the United States. Although the following list is not exhaustive, we will be interested in understanding your demonstrated interests in international activities (e.g., past international studies, past international travel, foreign language skills, and/or articulated reasons for your current interest even if you have no demonstrated past experiences), extracurricular activities and interests; public service; previous employment; demonstrated leadership abilities; academic abilities and scholarly interests. We will be open to any and all arguments why you should be selected for this opportunity, so feel free to argue beyond the factors listed above -- again, the list is not exhaustive.

Student performance in the externship program will be evaluated on a Credit/D or F basis. A determination of the student痴 grade will be based on the quality of the student痴 work (based on written and oral feedback from the supervisor), a journal that students will be asked to keep daily, and a short reflective paper in which the student summarizes significant learning experiences and ties the externship program to the academic portion of the course.

Academic Policies

The usual academic requirements for Texas Tech University School of Law will apply to the Lithuania Summer Law Program. A final examination will be administered.

The professors teaching the courses will evaluate the students performance using a final examination at the conclusion of each course and other standards that will be set forth in the syllabi, such as class participation. Each professor will either grade his or her examination, or for objective questions, will provide a key so that the on-site program director or Vytautas Magnus University may arrange for grading. Grading will be anonymous. Grading will be on the Texas Tech grade scale and will use a similar curve. Texas Tech uses a 4.0 grading system.

The acceptance of any grade or credits for any course taken in this program, including externships, is subject to determination by the participant's home school. Each participant carries individual responsibility for determining the transferability of grades and credits earned in this program.

It is unlikely that participation in foreign summer programs may be used to accelerate graduation. Inquiries should be made by the applicant to his/her home institution before application.

Attendance

Attendance is mandatory and each professor will check attendance at the beginning of every class session, and after each formal break. Each professor痴 syllabus will address students arriving late and leaving early. At the end of the course, the professor will submit attendance sheets to the administrative office, which will calculate compliance. Should a student miss more than 20% of class time, unless the onsite director allows otherwise, he or she will not be eligible to take the final examination.

Faculty

Professor Jorge Ramirez graduated from Harvard College in 1984 with an A.B. in Economics, and graduated from Harvard Law School with a J.D. degree in 1990. Professor Ramrez administers Texas Tech痴 international programs in Mexico, France, Germany, Lithuania, Denmark and Australia. His responsibilities include teaching international law courses at our Summer Law Institute in Guanajuato, Mexico. In January 2007, he was one of seven members of the Texas Lyceum Association (a statewide leadership organization) to be invited by the Central Party School (鼎PS) of the Communist Party of China to participate in an educational and cultural exchange program. The CPS serves as the Communist Party痴 ideological research institute and as the main training program for cadres slated for senior posts. Among other things, Ramirez participated in discussions with CPS leaders in both Beijing and Shenzhen, the first city in China to experiment with capitalism. In May of 2006, he was selected as one of five professionals to travel to Brazil as a participant in a Group Study Exchange Program ("GSP") sponsored by the International Rotary Foundation. The GSP provides participants with an opportunity to meet with colleagues in Brazil to discuss opportunities for collaboration, study and research. Professor Ramirez also participated in the "American Swiss Foundation Young Leaders Conference" held in Ermatingen, Switzerland in May, 2005. Participants in the Conference are nominated by prominent American and Swiss citizens and provide the next generation of leaders in Switzerland and the U.S. an opportunity to develop a deeper awareness of the other's perspective. The bipartisan group of fifty participants (half American and half Swiss) is selected on the basis of outstanding professional and personal achievement. Professor Ramrez serves as an editor of the Baltic Journal of Law & Politics, a joint publication of the Faculty of Political Science and Diplomacy and the Faculty of Law of Vytautas Magnus University in Kaunas, Lithuania; and he has received a number of awards recognizing his contributions to the university including the Law School Faculty Service Award for 2011, the Faculty Distinguished Leadership Award for 2011, the Professor of the Year Award from the Hispanic Law Students Association for 2008-09, the President's Excellence in Teaching Award for 2006, Texas Tech College of Education Teaching Award in 2005, and the Texas Tech Alumni Association's New Faculty Award for 2002.

Dr. Victoria Sutton holds the following degrees: B.S. in Zoology and B.S. in Animal Science cum laude from North Carolina State University; M.P.A., Old Dominion University; Ph.D., Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas; and J.D., magna cum laude from American University, Washington College of Law. She serves as the Paul Whitfield Horn Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Biodefense, Law and Public Policy, the only center at a law school in the U.S. to focus solely on issues of law and biodefense, biosecurity and bioterrorism. She established the Law and Science Certificate Program with unanimous support of the faculty, and directs the JD/MS Program in Environmental Toxicology, Biotechnology and Plant and Soil Sciences. Recently, Prof Sutton was on leave from her faculty position to serve as a political appointee for Pres. George W. Bush, as the Chief Counsel for the Research and Innovative Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation in Washington, D.C. from September 2005 until January 2007. Prof. Sutton was a Visiting Lecturer at Yale University in Fall 2004. At Texas Tech University, Dr. Sutton was awarded the university-wide President's Book Award for her groundbreaking casebook Law and Science: Cases and Materials. She was awarded the New Faculty Teaching Award in 2001, and received the Law School's Distinguished Research Faculty Award in 2002 and 2003. She chaired the University Academic Strategic Planning Task Force and the Texas Tech University System Task Force on Anti-Terrorism and Public Security.

Professor John Watts graduated from Harvard Law School in 1996 and earned a B.A. from the University of Maryland in 1992. He is admitted to practice in Virginia and Washington, D.C. After graduating from law school, Professor Watts clerked for the Honorable Henry Coke Morgan, Jr. of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. Following his clerkship, he spent eight years in private practice in Norfolk, Virginia, as a civil litigator in the areas of personal injury, product liability and False Claims Act, qui tam, "Whistleblower" litigation. Prior to joining the faculty of Texas Tech School of Law, Professor Watts was on the faculty of Barry University's Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law in Orlando, Florida. Professor Watts teaches Torts, Evidence, Products Liability, Constitutional Law, Civil Procedure and The Laws and Ethics of War. Before attending college, Professor Watts served four years in the United States Marine Corps and had the honor of guarding President Ronald Reagan at Camp David. Professor Watts was the Student Bar Associations 1L Professor of the Year for 2011-2012. He was also named the 1L Professor of the Year by the Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity of Texas Tech University School of Law for 2009-2010 and 2010-2011.

Professor Julija Kir喨ene. Ph.D., Mykolas Romeris University (Lithuania). Dean of the Vytautas Magnus University Faculty of Law. Lecturer of civil law in Vytautas Magnus University Faculty of Law.

Professor Charles Szymanski. J.D., University of Pittsburgh. Vice-Dean for International Relations of Vytautas Magnus University Faculty of Law. Lecturer of labor law, international public law, and diplomatic law in Vytautas Magnus University Faculty of Law and Faculty of Political Sciences and Diplomacy, and numerous universities and faculties in Poland.

Associate Professor Tomas Berkmanas. Ph.D., acquired in Vytautas Magnus University (Lithuania). Vice-Dean for Research of Vytautas Magnus University Faculty of Law. Lecturer of legal theory, legal philosophy and public law at Vytautas Magnus University Faculty of Law and Faculty of Political Sciences and Diplomacy.

Associate Professor Paulius Cerka. Ph.D., acquired at Vytautas Magnus University (Lithuania). Lecturer of civil procedure, tax law and business law in Vytautas Magnus University Faculty of Law and Faculty of Political Sciences and Diplomacy.

Assistant Prof. Jurgita Malinauskaite. Ph.D., acquired at the University of Westminster (United Kingdom). Lecturer of Competition Law and Public Law in the Brunel University (London).

Facilities

Vytautas Magnus University Faculty of Law, including its administrative office, is housed in a modern building near the center of Kaunas. The classrooms provide students with desk space. There are general outlets at the side-walls of the classrooms. Electrical outlets in Lithuania are European standard electrical socket types. The student will need travel plug adapter in order to plug in appliances that do not have the shape of these sockets.

The classrooms have Wi-Fi. Classrooms are equipped with computers and A/V equipment for the instructer痴 use and they are very similar to that available in most U.S. law schools. Students should bring their own laptops to the classroom if they wish to use a computer during class.

Lecture hall Lecture hall

Students may use the law library or other University libraries for their study. The locations of the different libraries and study rooms may be found at: http://biblioteka.vdu.lt/en/departments. All buildings of VMU, including the law library and classrooms, have free Wi-Fi internet access for students. Free access to electronic academic journal services (e.g. EBSCO, Cambridge Journals Online, etc.) and to the Westlaw database is provided by the University. Students can use the library痴 resources in preparing for lectures and seminars.

Vytautas Magnus's Library Small study area in library

Applicants with Special Needs

Applicants with disabilities or other special needs should contact the International Programs Office at Texas Tech University School of Law in advance to discuss arrangements. Although Kaunas and Vilnius are modern cities, they have preserved many of their historical buildings and sites within their ancient city walls, meaning that some locations may not meet U.S. standards for accommodations.

Although VMU痴 facilities have elevators and are generally accessible to individuals with disabilities, they may not fully comply with all of the U.S.痴 higher standards. The U.S. State Department discloses the following about Lithuania痴 accessibility and accommodation for individuals with disabilities:

While in Lithuania, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from what is found in the United States. Lithuania痴 Law on Equal Treatment prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities, although it does not specify what kind of disabilities. It mandates access to buildings for persons with disabilities; however, according to 2010 data from the Department of Statistics, only 40.1 percent of housing was accessible.

(See http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_952.html)

We recommend that the applicant contact the International Programs Office in advance so that Texas Tech Law can make every effort to reasonably accommodate the special needs of applicants.